User:Alton Ing

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Alton Ing

Director of Simplicity
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== Alton Ing is Director of Simplicity at the Health Strategy Innovation Cell, based at Massey College, University of Toronto. Alton has over 20 years of experience working within the areas of design, management, operations and strategy. During his career, he has assisted retail, manufacturing, automotive, and electronics companies to develop technology-based, process-driven collaborative solutions. Alton was a founding director of vLinx Inc, serving as VP of Information Techology and Director of IT Operations, leading the company through its start-up phase. He has acted as SAP Consultant to ICBC implementing provincial wide enterprise solutions. As an application consultant for DuPont Canada, Alton launched their first collaborative web-based applications suite world-wide. Alton acted as Product Engineer for Safety Products at Ford Motor Company, mentoring TQCM, Six-Sigma and ISO9000 initiatives. As Senior Project Power Engineer for Tectrol Inc, he has led design and manufacturing teams, developing biomedical and telecom products. Alton holds a BaSc in Electrical Engineering and a MaSc in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Toronto.warning.pngString representation Alton Ing is Director of Simplicity at the […] ngineering from the University of Toronto. is too long.


Description
A rapid, Web-based method for obtaining patient views on effects and side-effects of antidepressants This project was undertaken to develop a rapid method for obtaining a widespread sample of patient views on the efficacy and side-effects of antidepressants.

A Web-based method is described for rapidly and objectively obtaining patient views on the effects and side-effects of treatment with antidepressants. The method entails a systematized search of many URLs (Uniform Resource Locators, or Web page addresses), using keywords and phrases to extract the named drug and symptom that are reliably relevant to the medication being taken by the individual reporting the experience online. Unwanted medical conditions (e.g., cancer) are excluded.

Three successive searches of thousands of Web pages revealed a cumulative total of 835 "mentions" of patient experience on duloxetine, 756 for venlafaxine, 637 for citalopram, 636 for sertraline, 559 for paroxetine, 457 for fluoxetine, 318 for desvenlafaxine, 289 for fluvoxamine, and 210 for mirtazapine, in association with various symptoms. A comparison of the associated symptoms for each of the antidepressants found that the prevalence of the combined factor of fatigue, drowsiness, tiredness or lethargy ranged from 6.4+/-0.8% down to 2.9+/-0.15% of the mentions, where the S.E. was derived from three repeats of the Web-based analysis. The prevalence of dizziness or vertigo ranged from 7.6+/-0.8% down to 1.9+/-0.3% of the mentions.

Given the increasing number of patient narratives about drug experiences on open-access Web forums, this rapid novel method will have increasing utility in post-marketing surveillance and in comparing the effects of psychiatric medications.

PMID: 20705344 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Assessing and Responding in Real Time to Online Anti-vaccine Sentiment during a Flu Pandemic The perceived safety of vaccination is an important explanatory factor for vaccine uptake and, consequently, for rates of illness and death. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate Canadian attitudes around the safety of the H1N1 vaccine during the fall 2009 influenza pandemic and (2) to consider how public health communications can leverage the Internet to counteract, in real time, anti-vaccine sentiment.

We surveyed a random sample of 175,257 Canadian web users from October 27 to November 19, 2009, about their perceptions of the safety of the HINI vaccine. In an independent analysis, we also assessed the popularity of online flu vaccine-related information using a tool developed for this purpose. A total of 27,382 unique online participants answered the survey (15.6% response rate). Of the respondents, 23.4% considered the vaccine safe, 41.4% thought it was unsafe and 35.2% reported ambivalence over its safety. Websites and blog posts with anti-vaccine sentiment remained popular during the course of the pandemic.

Current public health communication and education strategies about the flu vaccine can be complemented by web analytics that identify, track and neutralize anti-vaccine sentiment on the Internet, thus increasing perceived vaccine safety. Counter-marketing strategies can be transparent and collaborative, engaging online "influencers" who spread misinformation.
Assessing and Responding in Real-Time to Online Anti-vaccine Sentiment during a Flu Pandemic Traditional communication and education strategies by public health authorities are limited in their capacity to counteract public concerns about vaccine safety.

Efforts to counter the arguments of the anti-vaccine movement, to calm fears and to provide accurate information require sustained, effective public health communication.

In order to evaluate, in real-time, Canadian Internet users’ attitudes to the safety of the H1N1 vaccine after Health Canada approved the vaccine, we surveyed a random sample of Canadian Internet users from October 27 to November 19, 2009 (Step A). In Step B, we determined which vaccine safety Internet sites were most trusted by the public by deploying a dynamic ‘Internet robot’ that informed us (i) which Uniform Resource Locators (URLs) discussing ‘myths and facts’ about the H1N1 vaccine were being most widely shared and discussed among English-language Internet users, and (ii) which Web sites, blogs, and links were being shared on social media sites.
Introducing myhospitalidea partership project with the Ontario Hospital Assocation The Ontario Hospital Association (OHA) and the Health Strategy Innovation Cell are pleased to present an interactive webcast on October 20 showcasing the roll-out of myhospitalidea.com. In the spirit of the Excellent Care for All Act, 2010, myhospitalidea.com will harness the power of the public’s ideas to continuously improve hospital quality. myhospitalidea.com will track what the public believes are the most exciting hospital “ideas in action” – real implementations in Canada and around the world that are gaining attention for their merit and growing success as measured by web analytics. When myhospitalidea.com is released, it will be a social forum to invite new, low-cost ideas from the public – and a place to celebrate the most exciting hospital ideas that have been implemented in hospitals in Canada and around the world to improve quality of care. Join this webcast to learn about the opportunities for a select group of OHA member hospitals to help steer the evolution of myhospitalidea.com. The webcast will explain the process of joining the Collaboration Council, the criteria for Council selection, and timelines and obligations of Council hospitals. The webcast will explain how myhospitalidea.com leverages trends in social media and collaborative open innovation. An example of collaborative health care innovation is the Innovation Cell’s leading patient-led idea generation platform: myhealthinnovation.com. The Innovation Cell, a not-for-profit think tank at Massey College, specializes in building collaborative innovation tools and capturing and analyzing real-time health information from the web.
Ontario Hospital Association and Innovation Cell Partner on myhospitalidea.com In the spirit of the Excellent Care for All Act, 2010, myhospitalidea.com will harness the power of the public’s ideas to improve hospital quality. myhospitalidea.com is a collaborative project between the Health Strategy Innovation Cell and OHA that will dynamically track what the public believes are the most exciting hospital “ideas in action” – real implementations in Canada and around the world that are gaining attention for their merit and growing success as measured by Web analytics. myhospitalidea.com will be a social forum to invite new, low-cost ideas from the public to improve the quality of care. Upon release of myhospitalidea.com, it will be a place to celebrate the most exciting hospital 'ideas in action’ that have been implemented in Canada and around the world


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